Dr. David Eckhoff


Finished Theses (Bachelor and Master theses only):

  1. Andreas Buck, Untersuchung adaptiver Kanalzugriffsmechanismen in Fahrzeug Ad-Hoc Netzen, Department Informatik, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg
    Supervisors: David Eckhoff, Reinhard German
  2. Christian Estelmann, Untersuchung von kooperativen Unfallvermeidungsalgorithmen unter Berücksichtigung der Fahrzeug-zu-Fahrzeug-Kommunikation, Audi AG und Department Informatik, Masterarbeit, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg
    Supervisors: Christoph Lauer, David Eckhoff, and Reinhard German
  3. Christopher Mattejat, Absicherung von Online Funktionen in vernetzten Fahrzeugen, Audi AG and Department of Computer Science, Master’s Thesis, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg
    Supervisors: Sebastian Siegel, David Eckhoff, and Reinhard German
  4. Florian Koerfer: Channel Access Mechanisms for Clusters of Parked Vehicles, Master’s Thesis, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg.
    Supervisors: D. Eckhoff and R. German
  5. Mokhtar Marzouk: Simulation-Based Evaluation of LTE in Vehicular Environments, Master’s Thesis, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg.
    Supervisors: D. Eckhoff and R. German
  6. Bastian Halmos: Simulative Bewertung der Auswirkung von LSA-Fahrzeug-Informationssystemen, Diploma Thesis, Department of Computer Science, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg.
    Supervisors: D. Eckhoff and R. German
  7. Rudolf Proske: Kommunikation and Datenverwaltung stationärer Fahrzeugverbünde mit VCP, Bachelor’s Thesis, Department of Computer Science, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg.
    Supervisors: D. Eckhoff and F. Dressler
  8. Christopher Dreher: Evaluierung vorhandener and Implementierung einer Open-Source-Network-Access-Control (NAC) Lösung im Bezug auf den Einsatz im heterogenen Netzwerk der University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Studienarbeit, Department of Computer Science, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg.
    Supervisors: Kai-Steffen Hielscher, Peter Hollezcek, D. Eckhoff, and R. German
  9. Carsten Demel: Einfluss von Fehlinformation in verteilten Verkehrsinformationssystemen, Bachelor’s Thesis, Department of Computer Science, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg.
    Supervisors: D. Eckhoff and R. German
  10. Mykola Protsenko: Qualitätsanalyse von Tracking-Algorithmen in Fahrzeugnetzen, Studienarbeit, Department of Computer Science, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg.
    Supervisors: D. Eckhoff and F. Dressler
  11. Christopher Saloman: Simulation von Car-to-X Kommunikation mit IEEE 802.11p. Bachelor’s Thesis, Department Computer Science, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg.
    Supervisors: D. Eckhoff and F. Dressler

Writing Your Thesis

At this page, we provide some information necessary while writing a thesis. Basically, the same rules can be applied for any other scientific paperwork. We must admit that this information collected here is neither complete nor represents it a general rule set. Nevertheless, we try to keep it up-to-date and comprehensive. If you have comments or suggestions, please drop me a short note.

Template

  • We provide a template for your thesis in LaTeX: Download.
  • Please try to stick with this layout.

General Rules and Hints

Structure of the document

The main document should be organized as follows. The ratio between the main sections (2.-4.) is 1/3 to 1/3 to 1/3! Regarding the size of the thesis, a rough measure might be 60-80 pages for a bachelor thesis and 80-90 for a master’s thesis.

Abstract / Kurzfassung: each about 1/2 page

    • How to write an abstract
    • Motivation (Why do we care?)
    • Problem statement (What problem are we trying to solve?)
    • Approach (How did we go about it)
    • Results (What’s the answer?)
    • Conclusion (What are the implications of the answer?)

1. Intoduction (general motivation for your work, context and goals): 1-2 pages

    • Context: make sure to link where your work fits in
    • Problem: gap in knowledge, too expensive, too slow, a deficiency, superseded technology
    • Strategy: the way you will address the problem

2. Fundamentals / environment and related work: 1/3

    • comment on employed hardware and software
    • describe methods and techniques that build the basis of your work
    • review related work(!)

3. Developed architecture / system design / implementation: 1/3

    • start with a theoretical approach
    • describe the developed system/algorithm/method from a high-level point of view
    • go ahead in presenting your developments in more detail

4. Measurement results / analysis / discussion: 1/3

    • whatever you have done, you must comment it, compare it to other systems, evaluate it
    • usually, adequate graphs help to show the benefits of your approach
    • caution: each result/graph must be discussed! what’s the reason for this peak or why have you observed this effect

5. Conclusion: 1 page

    • summarize again what your paper did, but now emphasize more the results, and comparisons
    • write conclusions that can be drawn from the results found and the discussion presented in the paper
    • future work (be very brief, explain what, but not much how)

References

    • all papers and articles used in the thesis must be cited (and each reference must be used in the thesis!)
    • a rough number is 20 references for a bachelor thesis and 30-40 for a master’s thesis
    • avoid to cite web sites
    • We highly recommend to use Endnote or BibTeX for creating the references and citations
    • Further information: IEEE Rules, BibTeX

Writing style

  • Avoid passive voice, active voice is easier to read. There is nothing wrong saying I (or we) did it
  • Avoid negative sentences: write in a positive (affirmative) voice, they are easier to understand.
  • Always use vector graphics for figures (PDF, EPS, …)

Last minute checks

  • Did I spell out the main points of the interpretation of results?
  • Are all equations, figures, tables numbered?
  • Do all graphs, tables, diagrams have descriptive captions?
  • Are all axes and scale carefully chosen to show the relevant effects?
  • Are all axes labeled? Do the labels include the measurement units?
  • Are citations in the caption (if a graph is borrowed)?

Last minute checks